Thursday, August 22, 2019

The Lesson by Toni Cade Bambara Essay Example for Free

The Lesson by Toni Cade Bambara Essay Toni Cade Bambara’s The Lesson revolves around a young black girl’s struggle to come to terms with the role that economic injustice, and the larger social injustice that it constitutes, plays in her life. Sylvia, the story’s protagonist, initially is reluctant to acknowledge that she is a victim of poverty. Far from being oblivious of the disparity between the rich and the poor, however, one might say that on some subconscious level, she is in fact aware of the inequity that permeates society and which contributes to her inexorably disadvantaged economic situation. That she relates poverty to shame—But I feel funny, shame. But what I got to be shamed about? Got as much right to go in as anybody (Bambara 604)—offers an indication as to why she is so hard-pressed to concede her substandard socioeconomic standing in the larger scheme of things. Sylvia is forced to finally address the true state of her place in society, however, when she observes firsthand the stark contrast between the rich and the poor at a fancy toy store in Manhattan. Initially furious about the blinding disparity, her emotionally charged reaction ultimately culminates in her acceptance of the real state of things, and this acceptance in turn cultivates her resolve to take action against the socioeconomic inequality that verily afflicts her, ensuring that ain’t nobody gonna beat me at nuthin (606). The Lesson posits that far from being insurmountable, economic and social injustice can be risen above, but it is necessary that we first acknowledge the role that it plays in our lives, and then determine to take action against it; indifference, and the inaction that it breeds, can only serve to perpetuate such injustices. Sylvia’s languid regard for Miss Moore, whom she refers to as this nappy-head bitch and her goddamn college degree (601), is a reflection of her initial disregard for the role that social injustice plays in her life. Miss Moore, with her proper speech (601) and desire to take responsibility for the young ones’ education (601), is a foil to Sylvia: educated, discerning, analytical. Her informed and realistic perception of the society in which they live qualifies her as an embodiment of truth within the story, and Sylvia’s rejection of her is thus symbolic of her overarching rejection of the truth. More than just refusing to acknowledge the verity of her poverty—And then she gets to the part about we all poor and live in the slums, which I don’t feature (601)—Syvlia even subconsciously runs away from it. Don’t nobody want to go for my plan, Sylvia says, which is to jump out at the next light and run off to the first bar-b-que we can find (601). Her compulsion to stray from Miss Moore suggests that on some subliminal level, she seeks to avoid confronting the truth that the lesson conveys about her indigent state. Upon arriving at the toy store, Sylvia notes: ‘This is the place,’ Miss Moore say, presenting it to us in the voice she uses at the museum. ‘Let’s look in the windows before we go in’ (602). That Miss Moore introduces the children to the store in her museum voice is indicative of her desire for the children to thoroughly analyze their new environment and synthesize what it might suggest about social stratification; Miss Moore means to show them that, like a historically significant painting in a museum, the society in which they live is worth studying intently. Although the explicit differences between the ghetto and Manhattan are immediately apparent, Sylvia initially fails to make the implicit connections between these external differences and larger social inequity. She boggles at the concept of a woman in a fur coat—Then we check out that we on Fifth Avenue and everybody dressed up in stockings. One lady in a fur coat, hot as it is. White folks crazy (602)—but fails to interpret what she sees in relation to the disparity between the rich and the poor. Instead, all she can do is point fingers and criticize. The children’s discovery of the fiberglass sailboat marks the story’s climax and signals the transition from rising to falling action. The cost of the sailboat provokes an as yet unseen emotionally charged, one might say true reaction from Sylvia: ‘Unbelievable,’ I hear myself say and am really stunned (603). More than just being stunned at the price of the sailboat, however, Sylvia is perhaps on some deeper level stunned at the emotions that have been roused within her. It is at this point in the story that her overriding indifference towards the roles that economic and social injustice play in her life begins to yield to a real emotional response to them. Although Sylvia has begun to respond to the disparity between the rich and the poor, she is still eluctant to fully accept it: So me and Sugar turn the corner to where the entrance [to the toy store] is, but when we get there I kinda hang back. Not that I’m scared, what’s there to be afraid of, just a toy store (604). The hesitation Sylvia encounters upon entering the store is a reflection of her desire to insulate herself from the feel ings of inadequacy she is beginning to experience: she understands that if she enters the store, she will be forced to finally confront the actuality of the socioeconomic gap that separates her from the people that the store caters to. The door to the toy store symbolically manifests this divide, as the toy store itself, with is exorbitantly priced items, is symbolic of the world of the wealthy. Sylvia’s struggle to get a hold of the door is indicative of her continuing struggle to accept absolutely her disadvantaged economic situation. Once inside the store, Sylvia can no longer ignore the blinding imparity between the rich and the poor. Her discovery of an overly priced toy clown prompts her to consider what could be bought for its price: Thirty-five dollars could buy new bunk beds for Junior and Gretchen’s boy. Thirty-five dollars and the whole household could go visit Granddaddy Nelson in the country. Thirty-five dollars would pay for the rent and the piano bill too (605). Sylvia is forced to finally address the socioeconomic inequality that works against her while simultaneously conferring certain luxuries on the rich: Who are these people that spend that much for performing clowns and $1000 for toy sailboats? What kinda work they do and how they live and how come we ain’t in on it? (605). In stark contrast with her earlier disregard for economic and social injustice, Sylvia is now incensed by it. Her anger is further incited when Sugar speaks on the implications of these newly perceived inequalities: ‘I think,’ say Sugar pushing me off her feet like she never done before, cause I whip her ass in a minute, ‘that this is not much of a democracy if you ask me. Equal chance to pursue happiness means an equal crack at the dough, don’t it? [†¦] I am disgusted with Sugar’s treachery (605). In concretely addressing the existence of socioeconomic inequality and its effects on their own lives, Sugar cements its realness in Sylvia’s mind—she can no longer run from it. It is thus the truth in Sugar’s words that she is disgusted with, not Sugar herself. Sylvia’s powerful emotions ultimately culminate in her resolve to not just acknowledge the roles that economic and social injustice play in her life, but to understand these njustices and eventually rise above them: We start down the block and she gets ahead with is O. K. by me cause I’m going to the West End and then over to the Drive to think this day through. She can run if she want to and even run faster. But ain’t nobody gonna beat me at nuthin (606). That Sylvia does not run with Sugar is symbolic of her refusal to run from the truth any longer; she now understands that it is her responsibility to face her situation head-on so that she might one day overcome it. Ironically enough, in the end it is the most cynical of the pack—the one whose idea it was to ditch Miss Moore—who extracts the most meaning from the day’s activities. In his analysis of The Lesson, Jerome Cartwright addresses the significance of Sylvia’s realization in relation to how it moves her to take action: [Sylvia] is changed in a way that promises hope for her ability to respond effectively to the newly discovered reality she faces (Cartwright 61). However, he suggests that although Sylvia’s realization regarding the unfairness of life and, as a black girl, her often low position in the scheme of things (61) is central to the story, the conflict between rich and poor and the economic injustice it reveals (61) is not what drives it forward. For Cartwright, the story is essentially about the value of lessons themselves, the value of learning and thinking. [†¦] The children do not simply need to learn one lesson: they need an education (61). While the importance of the children’s education should not be underestimated, Cartwright compromises the story’s primary importance by generalizing each of Miss Moore’s lessons into a collective importance. To conflate the importance of Sylvia’s realization about her socioeconomic status with the importance of the less critical lessons Miss Moore offers throughout the day—from the uses of the microscope to the components of the paperweight—is to downplay the story’s value as a commentary on economic and social injustice. Cartwright’s generalization in this way belies the story’s true meaning. Although historical surveys of the collective economic status of African Americans point to a long-standing relegation of blacks to lower income levels, current information points to a continuation of a long-term trend toward parity with national levels and absolutely higher levels of affluence than those experienced by most populations outside the United States (Wikipedia 10). Moreover, since the mid to late 1990s, [†¦] over 1. 7 million African Americans have gone off the poverty rolls, earnings by African American women have moved to within a few percentage points of white women’s, and unemployment among blacks in recent years has dropped below the 10 percent mark (10). While these numbers are not enough to invalidate the existence of socioeconomic inequality, they affirm that in this country, social and economic injustice can be mitigated. The unprecedented access to higher education and employment (11) that African Americans have been party to since the Civil Rights Movement speaks strongly to the opportunities for change that this country affords its citizens. However, the value of the struggle cannot be lost on us. We must recognize that such fundamental change does not manifest itself overnight: it is achievable only where a lasting commitment to it is available. Change is not beyond us. Action, however, is its necessary predecessor.

Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Second Hand Bags and Shoes Essay Example for Free

Second Hand Bags and Shoes Essay We are one of the largest sellers of second-hand shoes in Germany, are within the top ten in Europe and a major world player.We sell second-hand shoes worldwide.We have sold shoes for many years, the present owners being the second generation to continue the business, and sell second-hand shoes of different kinds to satisfy the needs of the market. Working closely with charities, local authorities and waste reclamation companies Boex has challenged old ideas and practices and developed new systems in the fields of collection, sorting, marketing and distribution. The state-of-the-art manufacturing unit is ideally positioned in Frankfurt/Main within a 20-minute drive of the Frankfurt/Main International Airport.Boex are genuinely committed to contributing to your charitable goals and providing you with the exceptional shoe collection service you deserve. Our mission: to supply consistently graded used shoes that enhance people’s lives and improve their self-esteem.| Description of franchise systemWhat all girls wantShoes Glorious Shoes is the shoe party business featured in glossy fashion magazines like the famous Vogue. We offer shoes, handbags, and boots from Italy and Spain in a relaxed and glamorous party atmosphere. Our shoe parties are the perfect event for a ladies night at home , for a fund raising event, for a company party, or for a fashion show.Shoes Glorious Shoes brings a whole shoe boutique to our customers homes, offering an unrivalled shopping experience. The ladies simply lean back with their girlfriends in the comfort of their sofa, having a glass of wine or champagne, and enjoy the unique customer service of Shoes Glorious Shoes. Everything we offer can be taken home on the night.Payment is accepted by credit or debit cards, checks and of course cash. Shoes Glorious Shoes parties are available during daytime or in the evening . Women with a love for fashion have already recognized that most High Street shoes look all the same. Shoes Glorious Shoes offers fresh designs, which are offered nowhere else.Everything we sell is of premium quality without costing the earth. The enormous success of Shoes Glorious Shoes demonstrates the huge demand for our glamorous shoe parties.Franchise conceptTo all shoe-lovers out thereShoes Glorious Shoes is a flexible franchise opportunity, which is operated from home, thus requiring only low overheads. Its up to you to fit your business schedule around your personal lifestyle and to decide whether you want to run it full or part-time.The earning potential of a Shoes Glorious Shoes franchise is unlimited. We put our collection together from trade fairs in Madrid, Milan, and Paris to guarantee that we offer only exclusive products which cant be found on the High Street. Our combined buying power ensures that we receive maximum discounts and the best rates.We regularly add new items to our collection to attract existing customers for repeated buys. We offer two different franchise packages, depending on your business goals. If you want to run a fulltime business, we recommend you to choose our Gold Level Franchise. The Silver Level Franchise suites best women who want to run a part-time opportunity.As a Gold Level franchisee, youll receive a protected geographical area as your franchise territory. Silver Level franchisees operate in one single town.Franchise partner profileStart working the glamorous way!Shoes Glorious Shoes is and this shouldnt come as a surprise the ideal franchise opportunity for shoe-manic women. If you are an entrepreneurial spirit with a passion for great shoes, then this could be the perfect opportunity for you.To run a successful Shoes Glorious Shoes franchise, you need to be communicative, open, friendly, and totally convinced of your business. If you are interested in joining the successful Shoes Glorious Shoes female franchise network and start a business thats all about girls true best friends, get in touch with us!

Validity of Brain Scanning Images to Study Human Behaviour

Validity of Brain Scanning Images to Study Human Behaviour The study of psychological phenomenon has shifted to focus more on brain activity. Critically evaluate the validity of using brain scanning images to study human behaviour Behavioural neuroscience is a term primarily developed in the early twentieth century and refers to the brain processes and physiological functions that produce human behaviour (Robinson et al, 2005). Pioneers of physiological psychology such as Karl Lashley (1950) surgically produced brain lesions in rats to observe learning and memory alterations, which resulted in many other psychologists mapping the parts of the brain involved, and relating it to human behaviour. This human behaviour, defined as the actions and responses humans portray (Holt et al, 2012), is extensively observed in human brain activity today, and can be monitored using brain scanning images. Some scanning images work by monitoring the electrical conduction of axons to different regions of the brain, glucose and oxygen levels in the brain and blood flow, whilst others visualize the brain structure using tissue density, and all can be used to pinpoint specific behavioural responses (Jezzard, Matthews Smith, 2001). These imaging techniques present processes that cannot be witnessed by the human eye and can distinguish what parts of the brain are at their most active during different stimulations (bremner, 2005). The increase of brain scanning images makes it one of the most popularly used neuropsychological tools in the field of biological psychology, and has also enthused the creation and promotion of new areas of psychology such as cognitive neuroscience. Yet there is still debate as to how successful brain scanning images are at locating and determining different human behaviours. This essay will depict different types of brain scanning images, their uses in relation to human behaviour, debate how successful or unsuccessful these uses are and hopefully establish a direction to the future of these neuropsychological tools. The brain is a very complex and active organ, using around 25% of the human body oxygen and 70% of its obtained glucose (Simon, 2007). Due to this complexity and high metabolic rate neuropsychologists want to establish why the brain uses so much energy and where it is consumed during different behavioural events. Originally, single-cell recordings were the most popularly used type of brain scanning images, pinpointing specific neuronal networks used when processing stimuli in relation to behaviour (Holt et al, 2012). For example Electroencephalograph (EEG) can help distinguish whether an ADHD sufferer has an inattentive or hyperactive subtype by monitoring different brain wavelengths (Pedersen, 2013). Clark, Barry, McCarthy and Selikowitz (1998) monitored children in various settings. They were aged 8-12 years and suffered with ADHD. Using EEG measures, the researchers found that the children had substantially higher levels of theta waves compared to the control group. In addition, t he children with an inattentive type of ADHD brain waves were closer related to the control group then that of the hyperactive subtype. This demonstrates how EEG measures are a successful non-invasive brain scanning technique, that can be used in many environments and reveals how simple brain scanning images can be used to determine different human behaviours. However EEG measures can be somewhat non-specific and need complex data analysis to help decipher the readings. Furthermore, establishing the amount of brain states an EEG reading can identify would increase the techniques validity (Schlà ¶gl, Slater Pfurtscheller, 2002). SOMETHING TO LINK Static imaging techniques such as Computed tomography (CT) or Computerized axial tomography (CAT) are used to present a visual structure of the brain and can be useful in detecting deterioration or injury of the brain (Demitri, 2007). They work by using X-ray technology to take pictures of sections of the brain, layering the brains interior from multiple angles. They are 100 times more accurate than normal X-rays and can be used on other bodily organs (CT scan, 2013). This non-invasive method can be used to identify brain abnormalities in abnormal human behaviour such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Pearlson, Garbacz, Moberg, Ahn, and Depaulo (1985) used CAT scans in order to establish a significant lateral ventricular enlargement in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder compared to a control group. Additionally, Bigler, Hubler, Cullum, and Turkheimer (1985) used CAT scans to observe changes in the brain structure of those patients with alzheimers disease and those w ithout. Results portrayed an intellectual decline and memory impairment for Alzheimer disease sufferers. Using these kinds of static brain imaging techniques can help establish a physical determent for human behaviour in relation to brain activity and can also give clinical validity to the technique because it is used not only on the brain but also on other organs (Quiroz et al, 2005). Wedding and Gudeman (1980) even suggest that CT scanning will be an ‘invaluable’ tool in the mapping of the functionality of the brain. However there are disadvantages with using static brain imaging, such as the cost of procedure, the risk of radiation exposure and the relatively poor detail the scan produces (Gould, Cummings, Rabuzzi, Reed Chung, 1977). In terms of identifying human behaviour, static brain images can only give a physical view of brain abnormalities so it is not always clear what is actually responsible for behaviour. Instead, dynamic brain scanning images can be used to investigate what is going on internally in the brain when humans experience behaviour. Positron-emission tomography (PET) scans use invasive techniques to measure brain activity such as metabolism, blood flow and neurotransmitter activity (Holt et al, 2012). A radioactive component is inserted into the blood and due to the decaying nature of this component; it is possible to use a detector to observe where the brain is using the most energy (Brain scanning images, 2014). For example Mayberg et al (1999) used PET scans to monitor stimulated feelings of sadness in depressed patients compared to recovered patients. They found that one specific area of the brain had increased blood flow in depressed patients compared to another area that had increased blood flow with the recovered patients. They go on to suggest these types of findings are significant for the use of medical treatments for such disorders, because the PET scan could ide ntify a specific brain region ‘responsible’ for the sadness felt in depression. Furthermore, Jones (2010) describes the work carried out by Dr Ned.H Kalin using PET scans on Anxious Temperament (AT) rhesus monkeys. The central nucleus region of the amygdala portrayed increased blood flow, suggesting an increase in emotion and fear of these types of monkeys. PET scans can be very useful in identifying whereabouts in the brain the most energy is being used when displaying certain behaviours. However, Lubezky et al (2007) also found that PET scanning can have interference when used on patients also having treatment for chemotherapy, which suggests PET scans are not always a successful tool in clinical research. This type of scanning can be very time consuming and the resolution of the brain structure is not as high compared to other brain scanning techniques, which means the functional information retrieved from these scans cannot always be accessed (Positron Emission Tomo graphy, 2013). This means establishing a cause for human behaviour is more difficult and not as concise, so PET scans may not be the most successful choice when researching human behaviour. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to create clear detailed pictures of the brain structure, a lot like CT and CAT scans. Sometimes a dye is injected into the vein to help contrast the picture and images are around 1/10 the size of a CT scan (Rosen, 2007). However, in recent years MRI advancing has resulted in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) that can produce dynamic pictures of blood flow in the brain instantly (Holt et al, 2014). This has made a huge impact in the neuropsychological field of establishing what parts of the brain react to different behaviours as it has allowed researchers to present stimuli and observe the results from the stimuli within seconds of it occurring (Jezzard, Matthews Smith, 2001). A wealth of research has been carried out to investigate this, for example Eisenberger, Lieberman and Williams (2003) used fMRI scans to investigate whether participants reacted to psychological pain in the same way as physical pain. Using a social exclusion task they found a significant relationship between parts of the brain activated during physical pain, in relation to emotional pain. Mastena, Morellib and Eisenbergerb (2011) investigated the effects on brain activity of participants feeling empathy towards an excluded victim, and found that participants with more empathetic personality traits had higher levels of activation in metalizing regions and social pain-related regions of their brain. This in turn led them to carry out more pro-social behaviour towards the victim of exclusion. Horn, Dolan, Elliott, Deakin and Woodruff (2003) also explored impulsivity in relation to aggression, suicide and violent behaviour. Using fMRI scans they found that participants who had greater scores on impulsivity scales had higher activation of paralimbic areas in the brain during response inhibition. Participants with lower scores on impulsivity therefore had lower activation levels in this particular part of the brain. It is clear to see how suc cessful fMRI scans can be at determining what parts of the brain are affected by different human behaviours due to the quick and detailed resolution of the scan. They are also non-invasive with the absence of radiation, making this method a more suitable and reusable option for patients (Devlin, 2007). However, in terms of studying human behaviour, there are statistical pitfalls when using fMRI scans, for example inappropriate interpretations and misunderstandings (Hughes, 2014). For example Watson (2008) describes Marco Iacoboni study investigating swing voters. They were shown political words that they didn’t agree with, such as ‘democratic’, and the amygdala was activated, indicating feelings of anxiety and disgust. However other areas of the brain also became stimulated, in association with reward, desire and connectedness, which presents an opposite interaction of what the participants are feeling, which questions the validity of the fMRI scan all together. Nevertheless, fMRI scans are currently being used in more advancing fields than ever before. The reliability of the scans has even been tested to find out whether they should be used in court as evidence of past memories (Harmon-Courage, 2010). On the other hand, many researchers would suggest it would be more beneficial in terms of research in human behaviour to instead focus on the behavioural and social techniques that could be used to understand behaviour, rather than biological observations. For example Watson (1913) described all behaviour as observable, and any unobservable phenomenon was not proper learnt experiences, and so could therefore not be measured. Yet due to the advancing field of brain scanning techniques, new areas such as cognitive neuroscience have become apparent, and use brain scanning images as a forefront for their research. Cabeza and Nyberg (2000) Analysed regional activations across cognitive domains and found that several brain regions, including the ce rebellum, are engaged by a variety of cognitive challenges, which again supports the use of brain scanning techniques in new fields to establish and understanding of human behaviour. Overall, brain scanning techniques are clearly confidently used in human behaviour research. There are many options as to which type of brain scanning technique to use so researchers can choose the method best suited to them, whether it is observing brain structure, or researching the dynamic function of the brain. That is not to say that there are not drawbacks with using brain scanning techniques. There are practical issues like the cost, and with some types of brain scanning techniques, the exposure to radiation that the participant must experience limits the amount of times a scan can be taken. Also, as explained above, it can also be quite difficult to interpret the scanning image itself and researchers cannot be completely confident that a certain part of the brain is responsible for a certain behaviour. However, the valid use of brain scanning images continues to increase, with new areas of neuropsychology producing new research outcomes, and the increased usage of them in cli nical fields. Finally, brain scanning techniques in relation to human behaviour can be said to be relatively valid because of the abundance of rich and detailed findings that they gather.

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

American Folk Music Essay -- Music History

The folk genre has origins all the way back to the 19th century, which in many ways is mirrored by many popular genres in modern musical genres. To make it easy folk music is merely, â€Å"ballads and songs which are composed and conveyed vocally, without being written.† Though what we distinguish ‘folk’ today as stylistically very different to what ‘folk’ was during the 19th century, at its basic form, it still holds the same standards and concepts, describing the simpler times. Through vigorous research, it’s hard to overlook the history and development of southern folk music, and how it may help understand the significance for observing and expanding the dynamics of southern race relationships. Both southern race associations and southern composition are replications of the social construction of the rural south. In the physically separated south, black and white melodic backgrounds show the same deviations and junctions which have historica lly characterized black and white relations. This is not an emotional analysis; but instead it is a socially ancient examination of regional popular culture which focuses upon the collaboration between two important features of that culture; race and music. The growth of the American folk music as a popular commodity is a process which matches the historical and cultural expansion of American society. In the formation of this commodity, two major streams, British and African, ran together over a two century period. Alan Lomax, one of folk music's foremost iconic historians, has observed that the junction of these varied elements has resulted in a cultural product which is "more British than whatever one can discover in Britain†. Southern music is a noteworthy measure of the folk customs; in man... ...nic scale by twisting the strings of the guitar to attain tones which expressed their feelings. These "bent notes" developed into a normal feature of the blues. Call and response patterns were complicatedly intertwined into the vocal arrangements of black music, both transcendent and secular. Yet another Africanism which merits attention is the widespread use of the "falsetto yell" "falsetto jump" in which the singing was elevated an octave "usually in the preceding syllable of a word, at the conclusion of a line". It is commonly understood that this mannerism was preserved in the field hollers and work songs of the slavery age and found its way into the early blues form. Some researchers have suggested that the "blue yodel† commercialized by Jimmie Rodgers and his many followers may have been an deliberate mixture of the Swiss yodel and the African falsetto jump.

Monday, August 19, 2019

Non-determinates Prices Of Sup :: essays research papers

Most people that are common shoppers have encountered a situation where the product that they were seeking to buy was not available. It is very easy to see that certain products do have an ample supply due to many reasons. Other than the price of that product, there are six major non-determinate factors of supply. These factors are: Number of Sellers, Technology, Resource Prices, Taxes and Subsides, Expectations of Producers, and Price of other goods the Firm could Produce. With these factors and the demand of the product, the supply of a product can be determined, and a price can be set.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  The number of sellers can be one of the most determining factors of the supply of a product. The concept is very easy to understand. If there are more sellers, that is more stores and manufactures, there will be a larger amount of supply of a certain product. On the other hand, if there are a small number of sellers then there will be little supply of the product. When considering the price of a product, if there are more sellers then there will be more competition; therefore, the price will be at a low cost for the buyers. The sellers will not make a large profit. Moreover, when there is a small amount of sellers then the price can be higher for the buyers. This means the sellers will make a larger amount of profit. For example; there are more sellers for a Toyota Carmry, then there are for Dodge Vipers.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  This world has experienced a huge technological advancement. Our knowledge in inventing new technologies has allowed us to become more efficient in the production of products. Also, we have been able to develop many new and better products for the buyers. Technology can do two things to the supply of a product. First, it can drive the price down due to more production of a certain product. With technology, production of a certain product has become cheaper and more efficient. The second thing that technology has done is decline the supply of certain product. With the production of new and better products, older products have become less used and not produced as much. A good example of how technology has effected this world is the invention and production of CD’s. In today’s world most Americans own a CD player and have gotten ride of the record player. Non-determinates Prices Of Sup :: essays research papers Most people that are common shoppers have encountered a situation where the product that they were seeking to buy was not available. It is very easy to see that certain products do have an ample supply due to many reasons. Other than the price of that product, there are six major non-determinate factors of supply. These factors are: Number of Sellers, Technology, Resource Prices, Taxes and Subsides, Expectations of Producers, and Price of other goods the Firm could Produce. With these factors and the demand of the product, the supply of a product can be determined, and a price can be set.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  The number of sellers can be one of the most determining factors of the supply of a product. The concept is very easy to understand. If there are more sellers, that is more stores and manufactures, there will be a larger amount of supply of a certain product. On the other hand, if there are a small number of sellers then there will be little supply of the product. When considering the price of a product, if there are more sellers then there will be more competition; therefore, the price will be at a low cost for the buyers. The sellers will not make a large profit. Moreover, when there is a small amount of sellers then the price can be higher for the buyers. This means the sellers will make a larger amount of profit. For example; there are more sellers for a Toyota Carmry, then there are for Dodge Vipers.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  This world has experienced a huge technological advancement. Our knowledge in inventing new technologies has allowed us to become more efficient in the production of products. Also, we have been able to develop many new and better products for the buyers. Technology can do two things to the supply of a product. First, it can drive the price down due to more production of a certain product. With technology, production of a certain product has become cheaper and more efficient. The second thing that technology has done is decline the supply of certain product. With the production of new and better products, older products have become less used and not produced as much. A good example of how technology has effected this world is the invention and production of CD’s. In today’s world most Americans own a CD player and have gotten ride of the record player.

Sunday, August 18, 2019

Christmas - An Extraordinary Holiday Essays -- Personal Narrative Writ

Christmas - An Extraordinary Holiday As I grow older, Christmas is the greatest holiday for my family and me. The powerful feeling of family is never any stronger than on Christmas Day. The stress of the time between Thanksgiving and Christmas Eve all seeps away as our children come running into our bedroom to see if we are awake yet. Even though our children are teenagers, the tradition doesn't change; Santa is real if you believe in him. I've seen our children wake up as early as 5:00 a.m. As our children awake us, my husband tries to draw out the anticipation by telling them he needs to take a shower first. After much begging and grumbling, they agree and the three of us make our way into the kitchen to bake cinnamon rolls. While my husband is showering, we are in the kitchen preparing the cinnamon rolls. By the time he is done, the smell of the gooey sweet cinnamon rolls is drifting through the house. As I pull the rolls out of the oven, my daughters are tearing into the stockings Santa filled while visiting the night before. Santa always remembers Mom and Dad, too. W...

Saturday, August 17, 2019

Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do

REFERENCE AND CITATION FORMAT FOR THE COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM DR ANDY DONG The Association for Computing Machinery is the pre-eminent professional body dealing in all aspects of information technology. This is a style guide for their reference and citation format. Note that there are some slight stylistic differences between the format for the magazine Communications of the ACM (per the style in EndNote) and the ACM conference proceedings reference format (per the style in the ACM conference proceedings template). This document will describe the Communications of the ACM style.Windows 7 Check Your UnderstandingIn practice, adherence to a single, consistent style is satisfactory. References Section The References section appears at the end of the paper. All references appear alphabetically by the lead author’s last name and are numbered consecutively. A clear header should be used to indicate the start of the References. Example: References 1. Bless, H. The Interplay of Affec t and Cognition. in Forgas, J. P. ed. Feeling and Thinking: The Role of Affect in Social Cognition, Maison des Sciences de l'Homme and Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2000, 201-222. . Garcia, A. C. B. and Howard, H. C. Acquiring design knowledge through design decision justification. Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing, 6 (1). 59-71. Citation As you write your report, you will cite your references. A citation to a reference in the body of the text is indicated by a bracketed number corresponding to the reference number in the References section. Example: During high stress periods, individuals should focus on the situation-specific tasks rather than rely on general knowledge structures. 1] Reference Formats GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS A complete reference should contain the name(s) of the author(s) and/or editor(s), the title of the article, the name of the book or conference proceedings where appropriate, and bibliographic information about th e article such as the name of the publisher, the city of publication, and the page numbers. The basic concept is that the reference should be sufficiently complete so that the reader could readily find the reference and can judge the authority and objectivity of the reference.All author names appear as Lastname, Initials. For example, if Andy Dong is the primary author and Alice M. Agogino is the second author, the correct appearance of the author names would be: Dong, A. , and Agogino, A. M. THIS IS THE REFERENCE FORMAT FOR A BOOK. Authors. Title. Publisher, City of Publication, Year of Publication. Example: 1. Fogg, B. J. Persuasive technology: using computers to change what we think and do. Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, Boston, 2003. THIS IS THE REFERENCE STYLE FOR AN ARTICLE WHICH APPEARS IN AN EDITED BOOK. Authors. Title. n Editors Title of edited book, Publisher, City of Publication, Year of Publication, Pages. Example: 1. Fischer, G. and Nakakoji, K. Amplifying designersâ€℠¢ creativity with domain-oriented design environments. in Dartnall, T. ed. Artificial Intelligence and Creativity: An Interdisciplinary Approach, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, 1994, 343-364. THIS IS THE REFERENCE STYLE FOR A JOURNAL OR MAGAZINE ARTICLE. Authors. Title. Journal or magazine name, Volume (Issue), Pages. Example: 1. Hirsh, H. , Coen, M. H. , Mozer, M. C. , Hasha, R. and Flanagan, J.L. Room service, AI-style. IEEE intelligent systems, 14 (2). 8-19. THIS IS THE REFERENCE STYLE FOR A CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS. Authors, Title. in Title of conference, (Location of Conference, Year), Publisher, Pages. Example: 1. Leclercq, P. and Heylighen, A. 5,8 Analogies per hour: A designer's view on analogical reasoning. in 7th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Design, (Cambridge, UK, 2002), Kluwer Academic Publishers, 285-303. THIS IS THE REFERENCE STYLE FOR ELECTRONIC MEDIA (ARTICLES, IMAGES, ETC. ) RETRIEVED FROM THE WEB.FOLLOW THE REFERENCE FORMAT FOR A JOU RNAL ARTICLE AND THEN INCLUDE INFORMATION ABOUT THE WEB SITE AND THE DATE WHEN YOU RETRIEVED THE RESOURCE. NOTE THAT THE DATE OF PUBLICATION AND THE DATE OF RETRIEVAL OF THE ARTICLE MAY NOT BE THE SAME. WHEN THERE IS NO DETERMINATE DATE OF PUBLICATION, USE (N. D. ) IN THE DATE FIELD. WHERE POSSIBLE, INCLUDE THE NAME OF THE ORGANIZATION HOSTING THE WEB SITE. Examples: In the following example, the Cornell Chronicle is a regular newsletter which is published online. Thus, we follow the journal/magazine format and include the volume and issue.Steele, B. Look, Ma, no wires! Cornell class project tests wireless networking, Cornell Chronicle, 31 (35). Retrieved February 15, 2004, from Columbia University: http://www. news. cornell. edu/Chronicle/00/5. 18. 00/wireless_class. html. The following Web page has no evident author, but the â€Å"Revised date† in the footer gives us the date of publication. MIT Project Oxygen: Overview, 2004. Retrieved March 15, 2005, from Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: http://oxygen. lcs. mit. edu/Overview. html.